Island Info

Island Info

Fuerteventura

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Fuerteventura is the second largest of the Canary Islands and the one nearest the African coast. It is a 2 hour drive from Corralejo at the north eastern tip to far south but just a 20 minute drive across the island from Corralejo to El Cotillo. It has the best beaches of any of the Canaries miles and miles of beautiful white sand most of which are naturist-friendly. In particular the Las Dunas National Park, starting on the edge of Corralejo and stretching
7 miles south.

There are three main tourist areas Jandia (mainly German), Calete de Fuste (a man-made resort) and Corralejo (still a fishing village although now much enlarged).

Although Fuerteventura is, quite rightly, known for its glorious beaches, it’s full range of watersports being a mecca for wind and kite surfers as well as excellent diving and snorkeling in its clear azure blue waters, there is much more to the island, and many things to do.

The landscape has a timeless quality, with large open plains, dramatic barren lavascapes with smooth volcanic peaks.    There are valleys dotted with the occasional oasis of palm trees.    Throughout the island many tiny hamlets of little whitewashed houses and historic churches waiting to be explored.    Remote beaches with no-one else in sight can still to be found.

Corralejo

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something for everyone (well, except lager louts !). The facilities on offer are numerous and, of course, there is the (almost) reliable sunshine, the beautiful white sand and turquoise sea.

The old heart of Corralejo remains, but is now just a small part of the new Corralejo. There was much building a few years ago, generally low rise and very tasteful, spreading south and hugging the coast, although there are parts often described as "Corralejo" a few miles inland.

Corralejo is now a developing resort with most of the facilities one would expect, but it is still a Canarian fishing village at heart.    It is, of course, a mecca for water sports of all kinds.    The restaurants and bars cater for absolutely every taste and nationality.    The Germans tend to head south, with its high-rise buildings, and the other nationalities to the more peaceful north, particularly to Corralejo and the fabulous National Park beaches just to the south of the village.

El Cotillo

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El Cotillo on the west coast of the island feels as though it has not yet caught up with the 20th century. The village still with its working fishing harbour and quaint streets of locals housing has some of the best fish restaurants on the island.

Although the coves in the village are of black sand, outside it the beaches are golden. To the south the long stretch of flat sand is a favourite of those experienced windsurfers able to cope with the strong undercurrents.

North of Cotillo are the famous lagoons, long a mecca for naturists. Here off-shore rocks hold back the pounding Atlantic waves to give shallow warm water lapping onto the almost white sand.

Beyond the lagoons is the lighthouse, with its museum of traditional fisheries, from where a dirt track leads along the island's northern coast to Majanicho and Corralejo.

Shopping Centre El Campanario

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The Campanario Shopping Centre in Corralejo is one of the prettiest on the island. Recreating the architecture of a typical Spanish village, El Campanario has a central square with fountain and outside cafes. The paved alleyways around have a wide variety of small shops, bars and restaurants.

The centre's emblem is its bell tower (campanario) which offers spectacular views all around the town.

Most evenings a drink in the square listening to a local group offering live entertainment of Canarian music or dance is a quiet, relaxing way to end the day.

Sunday is the day of the local craft market, when artisans from all over the island set up their stalls in the narrow streets with their home-produced goods - very unlikely to see a "made in China" label here. There is also a smaller flee-market on Saturday mornings.

Betancuria

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El Cotillo on the west coast of the island feels as though it has not yet caught up with the 20th century. The village still with its working fishing harbour and quaint streets of locals housing has some of the best fish restaurants on the island.

Although the coves in the village are of black sand, outside it the beaches are golden. To the south the long stretch of flat sand is a favourite of those experienced windsurfers able to cope with the strong undercurrents.

North of Cotillo are the famous lagoons, long a mecca for naturists. Here off-shore rocks hold back the pounding Atlantic waves to give shallow warm water lapping onto the almost white sand.

Beyond the lagoons is the lighthouse, with its museum of traditional fisheries, from where a dirt track leads along the island's northern coast to Majanicho and Corralejo.